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Power Factor Correction


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#1 bob14

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 07:11 AM

Hi Mark,

I have been reading the fantastic papers you wrote on bulk and static corrections. It is a known fact that by implementing power factor corrections, consumers would hardly benefit on k Wh consumption but rather on power factor penalties instead.
However, in the case of power generation, improving power factor would also mean that the kW generated by a plant would remain the same though the kVA demand on the generator would decrease. This obviously mean that the current drawn from the generator would be less for the same kW consumption. Does it mean that the generating plant would save on fuel consumption ? I doubt as the prime mover is always rated in k W .

Best regards .

Bob

#2 marke

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 08:16 AM

Hi Bob

The engine is loaded by KW and the KW of the load will not change with the addition of power factor correction, however the KVA will reduce with power factor correction and this in turn will reduce the I2r losses in the alternator, reducing the KW drawn from the engine.
The reduction in KVA will also reduce the KW losses in the cables between the alternator and the correction.

Best regards,
Mark.

#3 bob14

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 09:25 AM

Dear Mark,

Thanks for your prompt reply. This therefore means that the saving in fuel would only be marginal.

Regards;

Bob

#4 marke

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 06:01 PM

Hello Bob

Yes, however a saving is still a saving.
The savings will depend on the efficiency of the alternator.

If you have a power factor of 0.5 and an alternator efficiency of 50%, then the savings would be significant. If your power factor is more like 0.9 and the alternator efficiency is say 95%, then the savings will be small.

If you have a low power factor, improving the poser factor will enable you to run with more connected load on the genset which can mean shutting one genset down in situations where there are multiple gensets operating together.

Best regards,
Mark.




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