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Does Power Factor Correction Save Fuel On Diesel Generator?


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#1 mithu

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 10:52 AM

Hi guys

My question to you is does Power factor correction save fuel on diesel generators??

My senior high voltage engineer seems to think it does...but he cant convince me. He reckons it is Mechanical (KW) converted to electrical KVA...

I am on my internship at the moment and I understand the synchronous gen equivalent circuits and all.

My understanding is that mechanical power increase will result in electrical KW increase only, but reactive power will be affected by your Field excitation only...

Hence you can correct the PF all you want but you will still consume and draw the same KWs from the mechanical side of it hence no fuel reduction.

Am I correct ??? any one !! Please correct me if I am wrong..

#2 marke

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 06:04 PM

If the addition of PFC capacitors reduces the KW used, then there will be a reduction in fuel consumed.
The correct addition of PFC capaciors will reduce the inductive VARs and thereby reduce the current.
The current reduction will reduce the I2R losses and if this is signifcant, youwill get a fuel saving.
Best regards,
Mark.

#3 mithu

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 10:26 PM

QUOTE (marke @ Feb 14 2011, 07:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If the addition of PFC capacitors reduces the KW used, then there will be a reduction in fuel consumed.
The correct addition of PFC capaciors will reduce the inductive VARs and thereby reduce the current.
The current reduction will reduce the I2R losses and if this is signifcant, youwill get a fuel saving.
Best regards,
Mark.



Hi Mark.
Thanks for your reply, I am thinking same thing as you are, however my supervisor who is the HV engineer thinks it is mechanical KW from engine to Electrical output in KVA, meaning Reduction in KVA from alternator will reduce you KW required from Engine! does that make sense??

#4 marke

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Posted 19 February 2011 - 06:34 AM

Yes it does to a limited extent.
Reducing the KVA will reduce the copper losses in the alternator stator winding and that is KW, plus correctly applied PFC could reduce the distribution copper loss which is more KW (quite small).

Best regards,
Mark.




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