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Short Circuit MVA - Minimum value & Maximum Value


easyser

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MVA stands for Mega Volt Amps (mega = million), as opposed to kVA, kilo (thousand) Volt Amps.

Factors for calculating it are available generation capacity, less losses such as impedance, resistance, etc. through transforming and distribution.

"He's not dead, he's just pinin' for the fjords!"
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When providing the Short Circuit Capacity, MVA of the utility power network / system , the Minimum Short Circuit Capacity, MVA and the Maximim Short Circuit Capacity, MVA , both are indicated by the utility. For eg the minimum value may be 4000 MVA while the max value may be 5000 MVA. I would like to know the difference between the two and the need for specifying these two values ?
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OK, way beyond me, sorry.

If I had to guess, I would say the Minimum value would be what the utility can supply by itself, the Maximum value would be with all other contributions, i.e. other customer's rotating equipment loads at the moment of a fault that would contribute to the fault capacity of the system. Is this a real problem or an assignment?

"He's not dead, he's just pinin' for the fjords!"
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  • 4 years later...
Actually, the Min and Max short circuit capacity comes in to picture when more than one transformers supply to the network. The Min Short circuit MVA is for the case when only one transformer supply power to the network. The maximum short circuit MVA is for the case when more than one parallel transformer (with individual secondary) supply power to the network simultaneously. Usually, most of the substation has two transformers with their individual secondary to ensure reliability. Hence two limits are given for this type of configuration.
There is no problem as such;but I was interested in knowing the significance of these two parameters,specified by the utility company, for the customer.
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