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Thrige/titan As Comp 10 Hp Motor


skimoe55

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Hello Roger

 

Welcome to the forum.

 

What are you intending to do with this motor?

 

You do need to be careful with DC motors, especially running them at light load. Some DC motors can run away in speed and cause damage if they are not properly controlled.

 

If this motor is a shunt motor (not a compound motor) it should speed limit provided that you have the correct field current. If the field current is low, problems can occur.

You can control the speed by adjusting the armature voltage and keeping the field current correct.

 

I wonder if your supply is strong enough to drive this motor up to full load??

 

Best regards,

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Thanks Marke, I wanted to use this motor for a winch in front of my house for pulling logs up from the beach,on the wiring diagram it shows it can be wired series, shunt,or compound. I was hoping my house current would be enough to do the job but do not know if it would, also do not know the type of bridge rectifier and size I would need, Thanks Rodger
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Hi Skimoe55

 

How can it possible that the motor can be used series, shunt or compound? A series motor is always used in series connection and a shunt motor is always used in shunt connection. You can’t connect separately the series field winding of a series motor with a supply source. It would draw a large amount of current as series winding resistance is very low.

And the other hand, the armature resistance of a shunt motor is very low as compare to the resistance of shunt field winding. If you connect the shunt field winding in the series of armature winding, almost all voltage would be dropped by shunt field winding, and armature rotate in a very slow speed.

 

According to your spec, you’re motor is a shunt motor. You have to prepare two bridge rectifiers, one for field and one for armature. If your home supply is 240V, then you would get

((240*1.414)-1.4)*0.636 = 215VDC.

 

But big problem is that, this motor would draw a large amount of starting current if you apply full voltage at its armature. This starting current would damage the rectifier. I recommend you to purchase a current limiting chock and if you want to use this motor for a permanent bases, then you should purchase a DC motor starter.

 

"Don't assume any thing, always check/ask and clear yourself".

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Thanks for the info, I found a wiring diagram inside the motor that shows these three different ways to hook up the leads, also this motor has a tach attached to the rear shaft and a magnetic pickup on the drive pulley, Thanks again, Rodger

Hi Skimoe55

 

How can it possible that the motor can be used series, shunt or compound? A series motor is always used in series connection and a shunt motor is always used in shunt connection. You can’t connect separately the series field winding of a series motor with a supply source. It would draw a large amount of current as series winding resistance is very low.

And the other hand, the armature resistance of a shunt motor is very low as compare to the resistance of shunt field winding. If you connect the shunt field winding in the series of armature winding, almost all voltage would be dropped by shunt field winding, and armature rotate in a very slow speed.

 

According to your spec, you’re motor is a shunt motor. You have to prepare two bridge rectifiers, one for field and one for armature. If your home supply is 240V, then you would get

((240*1.414)-1.4)*0.636 = 215VDC.

 

But big problem is that, this motor would draw a large amount of starting current if you apply full voltage at its armature. This starting current would damage the rectifier. I recommend you to purchase a current limiting chock and if you want to use this motor for a permanent bases, then you should purchase a DC motor starter.

 

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