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Lrs Principle


alegna

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A very basic overview, but the advantage of wound rotor slip ring motor is that, through a LRS u can vary the resistance of the rotor. The advantages are

 

1. able to manipulate the torque speed curve, allowing u start with a much higher torque. Wound motors are suitable for application with heavy starting duties such as ball/sag mills, crushers etc.

 

Typically LRS in these situations are used to start only, and when motor has reached a certain speed, the rotor is short circuited and it acts like an squirrel cage motor. Some manufacturers offer brush lifting systems, which will raise the slip ring brushes when motor reaches nominal speed and increase the lifetime of the brushes.

 

2. vary the speed of the motor, although speed rage is limited by the LRS's heat dissipation systems.

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Thank u very much. This can help. :)

 

A very basic overview, but the advantage of wound rotor slip ring motor is that, through a LRS u can vary the resistance of the rotor. The advantages are

 

1. able to manipulate the torque speed curve, allowing u start with a much higher torque. Wound motors are suitable for application with heavy starting duties such as ball/sag mills, crushers etc.

 

Typically LRS in these situations are used to start only, and when motor has reached a certain speed, the rotor is short circuited and it acts like an squirrel cage motor. Some manufacturers offer brush lifting systems, which will raise the slip ring brushes when motor reaches nominal speed and increase the lifetime of the brushes.

 

2. vary the speed of the motor, although speed rage is limited by the LRS's heat dissipation systems.

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There are two ways a Liquid Resistance Starter can be used.

1) as a primary resistance starter where the resistance is connected in series with the stator of a standard squirrel cage motor and

2) as a secondary resistance starter where the resistance is connected in series with the rotor of a wound rotor motor.

 

Have a look at http://www.lmphotonics.com/m_start.htm and http://www.lmphotonics.com/slipring.htm

 

Best regards,

Mark.

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