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Motor Temperature


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Hello.

 

For me, there is not a standard. it depends upon the percentage of full load current which is being draw by motor. If motor is being draw say >90% of FLA (due to increasing of SLIP), it would produce more heat as compare with normal working (<80% of FLA and 3% SLIP).

According to my personal experience, i found the temperature of most of the motors between 50-80C.

"Don't assume any thing, always check/ask and clear yourself".

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Hello.

 

For me, there is not a standard. it depends upon the percentage of full load current which is being draw by motor. If motor is being draw say >90% of FLA (due to increasing of SLIP), it would produce more heat as compare with normal working (<80% of FLA and 3% SLIP).

According to my personal experience, i found the temperature of most of the motors between 50-80C.

 

 

 

Thank you very much sir for your information.

Appreciated it very much.

^_^ ^_^

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Hello Kidpaddy

 

Motors generate heat due to losses within the motor.

The amount of power loss is dependent on the efficiency of the motor.

Small motors may have efficiencies as low as 50% and large motors have efficiencies of up to 95%.

 

The temperature rise of the motor is a function of both the power loss in the motor and the thermal resistance of the motor to air.

The thermal resistance is the temperature rise divided by the power dissipated.

 

The maximum allowable temperature rise is dependent on the insulation of the windings.

There are several different insulation classes A, B, F, H which are rated in temperature rise.

Reference to motor data sheets will give you the efficiency and insulation class for real motors.

 

Best regards,

Mark.

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